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Check out 8 wearables that don’t go on your wrist

Image courtesy Sensoria Fitness

Never Been Wrist

The human body has a seemingly endless supply of ankles, elbows, and foreheads. So why do fitness wearables have to go on your wrist? Check out 8 devices that aren’t limited to just your wrist.

Sensoria Fitness
Form is everything for serious runners. Sensoria Fitness’ athletic socks are equipped with sensors that link up to a smartphone and offer real-time feedback on cadence and foot landing technique.

Under Armour
Sensoria Fitness’ socks aren’t the only fancy footwear on the market. Under Armour just released their SpeedForm Gemini 2 smart sneakers. The kicks track and transmit distance traveled, stride length, and pace.

Dive In
For swimmers, truly waterproof trackers that aren’t going to hamper your stroke are few and far between. FlyFit is an ankle bracelet that can more accurately detect leg movements in the pool and on a bike, as well as monitor sleep. The product launched with a successful Kickstarter campaign and is now available for $169.

Loosen Up
We all know that feeling – you’ve just had a huge meal and you need to loosen the belt buckle a notch or two to feel comfortable again. Well, motorized smart belt Belty takes care of that fore you. It can automatically loosen or tighten based on waist size and if you’re sitting or standing – perhaps it’s more of an anti-fitness wearable. Though to be fair, the product also tracks activity and steps, offering healthier behavior suggestions via vibrations.

Balance is Key
The Jins Meme smart glasses monitor your eyes to offer insight into your workout, by tracking an unlikely habit – posture and balance. The unisex spectacles also monitor fatigue via the number of blinks, sending an alert if you’re too tired to drive.

Look Towards the Future
CES 2016 brought us a plethora of exciting new technologies that look beyond the wrist. Samsung’s Welt smart belt can identify overeating via belt tension. OMsignal’s high-tech sports bra uses internal sensors to monitor breathing rhythm, fatigue, and biometric effort. And Garmin’s Varia Vision is an augmented reality device that mounts to sunglasses, promising traffic information and directions to cyclists and more.

Now go forth (and free your wrist).

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