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Shutterstock’s new Empire State Building HQ must be seen to be believed

All photos credit Bilyana Dimitrova

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Shutterstock was founded in 2003 by a photographer looking to sell some of his own pictures. Today, the company is perhaps Silicon Alley’s biggest success – publicly traded on the New York Stock Exchange and operating in more than 150 countries (not to mentioned, listed as one of the coolest companies to work for in NYC).

Earlier this year, Shutterstock’s New York HQ – the company also has offices in Berlin, Chicago, London, San Francisco, and Denver – moved from the Financial District to offices in the Empire State Building (after a $10 million renovation, naturally).

We recently took a tour of the new digs, and, to be perfectly frank, we still can’t contain our jealousy. Have a look.

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Welcome to the reception area, featuring 4K video screen featuring Shutterstock content. 

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Yes, there’s a second floor. In all, the Shutterstock offices consist of 85,000 square feet (10k of that is outdoors). 

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The stairs lead to the Café, where free lunch is provided every day for 300+ employees. 

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Welcome to the vaguely terrifying Wonderland Game Room, featuring work from a Shutterstock artist. 

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For the more old-fashioned sort, there’s also an 8-Bit Game Room. 

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Behind this hidden doorway… 

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…is the secret library. 

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That’s right, there are two massage rooms. 

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Naturally, there’s also a yoga studio. 

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But of course, work must get done sometime. The company analyzed 50,000 hours of meeting time to determine the size and number of the office’s conference rooms. 

Shutterstock is also hiring for over 90 jobs – and not just in their New York offices. Get all the details here.

Now go forth (and upgrade).

Nitty Gritty:

3: Average time, in minutes, Shutterstock’s move saves employees on their commute

61: % of Shutterstock meetings with 4 or fewer people

1931: Year the Empire State Building was completed

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