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Uncubed Entry 6/6/18


Hey there,

It’s the first week of June. It’s also Wednesday, my dudes. How’s yours going?

We’d love to hear about what you’re up to this Summer… working/researching on campus? Interning in SF? Full-time in NYC? Traveling or lounging at the beach?

Drop a note into the Uncubed Community Facebook group, and let us know! Hopefully y’all can connect in person this Summer.

In the meantime, here’s some beach reading 🏖📚

With love,
The Uncubed Team


FEATURED COMPANY: VENMO

Venmo Office NYC
Unless you love paying for your entire friend group, you’re probably familiar with Venmo by now. But in case you’re not:

Venmo is a mobile payment service owned by PayPal. It allows users to transfer money between one another using a mobile app or web interface. Venmo currently has around 203 million active users.

You can be a part of this growing team because Venmo is hiring in New York, California, & Chicago!

👉 Learn more + apply here. 👈


INTERNSHIPS

ENTRY-LEVEL JOBS

 


CRITICAL THINKING INTERVIEW QUESTION

This question comes from The Muse

Question: How would your boss or colleagues describe you?

Why they’re asking: The hiring manager wants to see how you work with others, what you’re like, and how you answer a question where you’re asked to evaluate yourself.

Here are three possible approaches:

1. Quoting an Official Performance Review

The easiest way to answer this question is to paraphrase a recent positive performance review. Referencing specifically where you’re getting your information from makes it easier to describe yourself as “trustworthy, dedicated, and creative” without cringing. You’ll also want to give some big picture context about your role and responsibilities to fill in the gaps around your answer. Altogether, it’ll sound something like this:

Actually, in my most recent performance review in April, my direct supervisor described me as someone who takes initiative and doesn’t shy away from hard problems. My role involves a lot of on-site implementation, and when things go wrong, it’s usually up to me to fix it. Rather than punting the problem back to the team, I always try to do what I can first. I know she appreciates that about me.

2. Start With the Story and Share the Takeaways

Another way to do this is to start off with the story and conclude it with how your boss or co-workers would describe you. Since the question is pretty open-ended, this is a great opportunity for you to share something you really wanted to mention in the interview but haven’t had the chance to yet.

Or, it could be the other way around. There might be some trait or skill you know the hiring manager is looking for, and the opportunity to talk about it hasn’t come up yet. This is your chance.

One thing I’ve noticed is that I’m always the one people turn to for recommendations on how to handle a new event or program—the latest fundraiser that I just told you about would be one. I have a lot of institutional knowledge, which helps, but I think the reason people come to me is because I work through what a new program might look like very methodically. If you were to ask my colleagues, I’m confident they’d describe me as logical, organized, and meticulous.

3. Naming Three Positive Traits With Short Examples for Each

Coming up with stories can be tricky when asked on the spot (which is why you should have a few prepared), so if you just can’t think of anything, here’s another approach. Try to think of three positive traits you bring to your work or workplace. Then, have a short example after each. It might go something like this:

I don’t want to speak for anyone else, but I’m pretty confident my colleagues would describe me as thoughtful—I’m the one in the office who remembers everyone’s birthdays—and hard-working, since I never leave my office until it’s been dark out for a couple of hours. My boss in particular would say I’m very knowledgeable about audience development—it’s why I kept taking on more and more responsibilities in that domain.”

 


TECHNICAL INTERVIEW QUESTION (via GeeksforGeeks)

Given a string, print all permutations of a given string.

Input:
The first line of input contains an integer T, denoting the number of test cases.
Each test case contains a single string S in capital letter.

Output:
For each test case, print all permutations of a given string with single space and all permutations should be in lexicographically increasing order.

Constraints:
1 ≤ T ≤ 10
1 ≤ size of string ≤ 5

Example…

Input:
2
ABC
ABSG

Output:
ABC ACB BAC BCA CAB CBA
ABGS ABSG AGBS AGSB ASBG ASGB BAGS BASG BGAS BGSA BSAG BSGA GABS GASB GBAS GBSA GSAB GSBA SABG SAGB SBAG SBGA SGAB SGBA


LIFE TIP OF THE WEEK

You are qualified. Imposter Syndrome is real, here’s what it is and here’s what you can do about it.


THIS WEEK’S INTERNET FINDS

 


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See you next Wednesday!
The Uncubed Team

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